INVASIVE SPECIES

The introduction of non-native invasive plant and animal species to North America has been escalating with widespread destructive consequences. The impacts of the spread of invasive plants are well known: habitat disruption, loss of native plant and animal communities, reduced property values, impaired fishing and degraded recreational experiences, and enormous and ongoing control costs..

 
 
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Tracking invasive species

This Web Application was built using Esri's Web AppBuilder. The purpose of this Web App was to create an interactive map that presents the known occurrence records of New Brunswick’s priority invasive plant species, and also to serve as a platform for users to report their sightings online. This application will be used to monitor the distribution of priority invasive species in New Brunswick, and also will serve as a tool when determining which areas to focus control measures on. This Web App will continue to update and grow as an initiative to raise awareness of invasive species in New Brunswick. This project was made possible through the financial support of Environment and Climate Change Canada's National Wetland Conservation Fund.


volunteer Invasive Plant patrol

In 2016, Eastern Charlotte Waterways in partnership with New Brunswick Alliance of Lake Associations launched the New Brunswick Invasive Plant Patrol Program. The program provides training, technical services, and resources to support volunteers in an effort to prevent the introduction and spread of invasive species in New Brunswick.

Since then Eastern Charlotte Waterways has trained over 50 volunteers on how to properly identify priority invasive species, and conduct a screening survey on their lake. To learn more about this program, please visit www.nbala.ca. This project was made possible through the financial support of the New Brunswick Environmental Trust Fund.

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invasive plants in new brunswick wetlands

In 2016, Eastern Charlotte Waterways received funding from the National Wetland Conservation Fund to survey wetlands for priority invasive species. Invasive species such as Glossy Buckthorn (Frangula alnus) and Eurasian Water Milfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) have the ability to spread aggressively, forming dense stands that restrict native wetland plants, and alter the structural and ecological values of wetlands.

This two-year project involved:

1. Surveying 15 inland wetlands, documenting the taxonomy, location, and density of identified invasive species;

2. The development of Best Management Practices (BMPs) and control strategies for Glossy Buckthorn (Frangula alnus) and Woodland Angelica (Angelica sylvestris);

3. The control of invasive plants identified in surveyed wetlands.

This project was made possible with the financial support of Environment and Climate Change Canada's National Wetland Conservation Fund.


Chain pickerel (esox niger)

In 2016, Eastern Charlotte Waterways received funding from the National Wetland Conservation Fund to survey wetlands for priority invasive species. Invasive species such as Glossy Buckthorn (Frangula alnus) and Eurasian Water Milfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) have the ability to spread aggressively, forming dense stands that restrict native wetland plants, and alter the structural and ecological values of wetlands.

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